2/27/2006 04:04:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P| "A lie, I believe, often proves more powerful than the truth. This story starts with a - a lie passed down in my family from generation to generation - but it ends, here, now, with the truth, and while a lie can be more powerful, the truth is almost always more frightening. "
--From Beneath Black Boughs My Darlings Slumber
I love chapbooks. Always have; always will. And I'm pleased to announce that Naked Snake Press has just released my short story "Beneath Black Boughs My Darlings Slumber" in chapbook format. This is a story of ancient curses, dark witchcraft, and pacts made with primal forces of nature long ago. You can order your very own copy directly from the publisher by clicking here or from Shocklines, the online horror bookshop by clicking here.
|W|P|114104254364658772|W|P|Beneath Black Boughs Now Available|W|P|3/04/2006 12:35:00 AM|W|P|Blogger Aquaryan|W|P|Okay, what is a chapbook?3/08/2006 11:43:00 AM|W|P|Blogger Cullen Bunn|W|P|Chapbooks are digest-sized booklets, usually 50 pages or less, I guess. A lot of small press publishers release them (almost everything Undaunted Press published was a chapbook).2/23/2006 06:27:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P| Starting today, the comic book website www.brokenfrontier.com will be running a weekly column by yours truly. Essentially, the column will examine some of the comic book moments over the years that have changed me from a casual reader to a comic book junkie. This week's column -- the day the Avengers die! Hope you enjoy it.
POW! Moments
|W|P|114070537616128980|W|P|Your Weekly Moment of POW!|W|P|2/20/2006 07:13:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|Know what I did this morning? Sat on the couch, ate cereal, and watched cartoons. All my friends know I'm never gonna grow up, and watching children's television just proves it, right? You may call it being childish. I call it staying young and--if I want to be more practical about it--doing research. My new favorite show is Cartoon Network's Ben Ten . As far as I'm concerned, there hasn't been a cartoon this fun in years. If this show had aired when I was a kid, I would have come running whenever it was about to come on. Cartoon Network ran a marathon of episodes yesterday and I decided it couldn't hurt to give it a shot. I was delighted to find aliens, cyborgs, mutants, and weird 1950s-style sci-fi paranoia in every episode I've watched so far. Ben Ten is the story of Ben Tennyson, who finds a device called the Omnitrix that allows him to take the form of 10 different aliens. One's strong, one's super-fast, one's the gross-looking bug ... you get the idea. Ben is spending the summer cruising the country with his Grandpa Max and cousin Gwen in an RV. Everywhere they go, weirdness follows, whether it's sea monsters, alien bounty hunters, or bank-robbing robots. Ben always manages to save the day, but each episode ends on a brooding hint of darkness to come. Ben Ten is a kid show, sure. It's also the kind of story I would love to tell. In some ways, the series is a little similar to a new young adult novel I've been working on, but it's different enough not to worry me. Now if 5:00 would just get here so I can rush home to watch another episode. Heck, maybe I'll even drink a CapriSun and eat one of those tiny bags of Doritos, too. |W|P|114044945558176940|W|P|So I'm A Big Kid At Heart|W|P|2/20/2006 11:27:00 PM|W|P|Blogger LE|W|P|sounds like an awesome morning. i haven't watched cartoons lately, but i do enjoy spongebob once in a while.2/23/2006 01:01:00 PM|W|P|Blogger Steven Elias Marx|W|P|Most of the cartoons I used to watch aren't on anymore. The Star Trek animated series. The original Johnny Quest. The Fantastic Four series where Reed used to rhyme. I miss those cartoons with Saturday morning Eggos and syrup.

I'll have to check Ben Ten out -- it does sound like an idea you once told me about.

Steve2/14/2006 08:21:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|If only it made those transforming sounds ... http://www.techeblog.com/index.php/tech-gadget/wr-07-a-real-transformer|W|P|113993422260071205|W|P|Now All We Need Is A Little Energon ... And A Lot of Luck|W|P|2/12/2006 10:49:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|What a simple joy--digging through quarter comics at a Saturday morning comic show. While I didn't discover any amazing treasures in the 4 for $1 box, I managed to fill a few gaps in my want list and share a few laughs with the vendor. Avengers, X-Men, some Bob Layton Iron Man, a few issues of Byrne's Fantastic Four, even a couple of issues of New Mutants and Ghost Rider and Howard the Duck. Nothing that would knock the speculator's socks off, but an afternoon's worth of entertaining reading material. After I scoured the quarter, I looked for a few pricier items, although bargains still abounded and I paid just a couple of bucks each for some true gems, such as Conan #58 (Queen of the Black Coast), Uncanny X-Men #108 (The X-Men and the Starjammers versus a big-ass robot), Uncanny X-Men #124 (Colossus takes on the Persona of the Proletarian!), Marvel Chillers #1 (Modred the Mystic), Marvel Two-in-One #1 (The Thing AND the Man-Thing), Sandman #1, and Kamandi #29. Those last two deserve a little discussion. Both sprang from the mind of Jack Kirby, and both feature some of the wildest characters, art, and stories ever to grace comics. The Sandman was published in 1974. He was a super-hero who wore yellow and red, monitored dreams with his Universal Dream Monitor, and used a pair of nightmares named Brute and Glob to help him out of tight jams. With a toot of his hypersonic whistle, he could enter dreams and combat evil. Glob and Brute, whom Sandman kept in glass cells, were kinda evil. For instance, when young Jeb, in his dream, takes a deadly fall, Brute and Glob cry with glee. "Let him fall! Let him die!" But the Sandman was made of nobler stuff. Kamandi: The Last Boy on Earth was a wild end of the world comic, and #29 features a tale of intelligent gorillas who worship "The Mighty One" and await his return. The legendary figure in this case was Superman, and the apes kept his blue and red uniform in a secret vault. When Kamandi's friend Ben is mistaken for the Mighty One, he must undergo a series of challenges, including trial by combat, moving a boulder called "the Daily Planet," and withstanding the blast of a gatling gun (Ben could turn into a metal form, like the X-Men's colossus). In the end, Ben passes the tests, but he leaves the costume in the vault for the day the real Mighty One would return. If for nothing else, watching intelligent gorillas launch themselves into the air with a giant catapult in order to "leap tall buildings in a single bound" was a lot of crazy fun. Cindy came to the show with me since we were heading to Starbucks and the winefest afterwards. I couldn't really get her to find anything for herself, although she said she'd be willing to read a comic that featured "naked Wolverine." When she realized the comic version of the character was much hairier than Hugh Jackman, she changed her mind. The winefest afterwards was a lot of fun, too, but the wine-induced headache for the rest of the day was dreadful to say the least.|W|P|113977226990947092|W|P|Quarter Box Plunder|W|P|2/12/2006 05:50:00 PM|W|P|Blogger LE|W|P|lol @ cindy's comment. yeah the movie wolverine has a certain sex appeal.

wine always gives me a headache. :(4/11/2006 11:00:00 PM|W|P|Anonymous Anonymous|W|P|Rock on!!!
Quarter boxes rule.
I always dig through the "bargain boxes" first... you never know what you'll find.

-]@/\/\!32/11/2006 06:21:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|The chances of getting any writing done today are slim. Two events conspire against me. First of all, there's a tiny comic books show I'd like to attend. It's cramped and smells kinda funny, but the quarter comic boxes are fun to dig through. Immediately following the comic show, Cindy and I are hitting the 19th Annual Missouri Winefest. The event benefits the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America, and twenty or so Missouri wineries offer up samplings of their delicious wines. We've attended every Valentine's weekend for the past few years, and it's always a great time. But I know when I get home I'll be in the mood for napping, not writing. Oh well. Maybe I'll dream some terrific story idea.|W|P|113966823353190368|W|P|No Writing Today|W|P|2/08/2006 06:54:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P| And to think, I wasted my time building goofy-looking cars and robots when I could have been building a tribute to CTHULEGO. This really is a lot of fun. Creator Mark Stafford knows his way around Legos. Check out a detailed photo gallery here.|W|P|113941072382493657|W|P|I Should Have Kept My Legos|W|P|2/10/2006 01:43:00 PM|W|P|Blogger LE|W|P|nice blog. the recliner in your office is a nice touch.

btw - i'm visiting via myspace. :)2/10/2006 07:07:00 PM|W|P|Blogger Cullen Bunn|W|P|Thanks, le! Glad you like it! Pop on over from Myspace any time you like!2/07/2006 10:41:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|Here's a first look at the cover to my upcoming chapbook from Naked Snake Press as illustrated by my friend Brian Hurtt. |W|P|113933794369188494|W|P|Beneath Black Boughs My Darlings Slumber|W|P|2/06/2006 03:37:00 PM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|Over at www.newsarama.com, James Lucas Jones, Editor-In-Chief at Oni Press has some nice things to say about me, my upcoming comic, and my co-creator. Check it out if you have a moment and learn a little bit about what's going on with this wonderful comic publisher.|W|P|113926935390227605|W|P|Aww, shucks!|W|P|2/05/2006 05:10:00 PM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|
"We'll see you get a little taste of Hell in this world before you pass into the next."
Over the weekend, I spent a couple of nights at the cabin, a nice secluded spot perfect for relaxation and reflection ,,, as well as spooky horror movies. The 2004 horrific western Dead Birds certainly fit the bill. The setup is pretty straightforward: during the civil war, a group of outlaws hide out in a haunted house. Hijinx ensue.
I'm not big into spoilers, so I'll avoid any major revelations regarding the film. Suffice it to say, it had almost everything I could have wanted from a horror movie. The heroes--or anti-heroes in this case--are faced with a plethora of terrifying occurrences, and the filmmakers threw in a heaping helping of brooding ambiance, chills, and even a few startling jumps. More a Lovecraftian story than a ghost story, the tale leaves its fair share of unanswered questions ... but there are plenty of clues to the nature of the evil lurking within the Hollister house, and the story will resonate with you for a while.
A few problems and inconsistencies keep the film from being perfect. An odd transition from day to night is either going to blatantly stand out to you or go unnoticed. I actually think this might have been on purpose. The sun's still shining when the outlaws reach the plantation, but as soon as they enter the house, it's dark outside. It came off as a kind of eerie sign of things to come, to me, but it might just bother other viewers. Also, upon watching the commentary track, I discovered the most overdone supernatural death in the story was originally scripted as a suicide. The writer's original idea would have worked much better, but I guess the producers really wanted to throw some so-so CGI into the movie.
I feel pretty inspired after watching this movie, though, and give it a high recommendation. Sixguns, ghosts, demons, and scarecrows ... How can you go wrong?
Once you've seen the movie, you may want to visit this excellent resource to get an even deeper understanding of the story.
Incidentally, the story reminds me of another low-budget horror movie, Scarecrows from 1988, in which a group of payroll thieves hijacking a plane crash land near a haunted farmhouse. Hijinx ensue. Both movies are fun, although the "creep factor" is much higher in Dead Birds.
|W|P|113918883226289633|W|P|Dead Birds|W|P|2/05/2006 02:06:00 PM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|
"Paying the bills via writing is my definition of success." --Brian Keene, World Domination 101
Horror author Brian Keene has started a new blog titled World Domination 101. This blog will feature articles, essays, and advice for beginning and mid-level horror writers. I think Brian has a lot of good things to say here, so if you're a writer, check it out. If you aren't a writer, you might get a kick out of Brian's other Journal, Hail Saten.|W|P|113917748446860695|W|P|World Domination 101|W|P|2/03/2006 05:36:00 AM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|
"If you don't have the time to read, you don't have the time or the tools to write." --Stephen King, ON WRITING
This is the other half of my office. One of the biggest mistakes I could have made as a writer ... at least as a writer with hopes of being productive ... was to add a recliner, TV, and DVD player to the office. Sometimes, while sitting at the keyboard, it's just too tempting to stretch out on the recliner to "write in longhand." That can often lead to popping a DVD in the player so I can "clear my head and become energized." Sometimes, I need that. I need to read a few pages of a favorite writer's book to become inspired when the words aren't flowing. I need to watch a few minutes of a movie to get the juices flowing. While you can't really see it in the picture, I keep a notebook, AlphaSmart, and alarm clock right next to the recliner. All useful tools when I'm telling myself I'm not wasting all of my valuable writing time.

Across from the TV are my barrister shelves, filled to the brim with Arkham House and other prized volumes. Beneath the window is a wall to wall ledge filled with my To Be Read pile. There's a poster from one of my favorite movies (Big Trouble in Little China) next to the chair, and Alan M. Clark prints on every wall.

So maybe this side of the office represents a mistake when it comes to my writing ... not my first ... certainly not my last ... but definitely my favorite.

|W|P|113897507477132425|W|P|A Big Writing Mistake ... Office Tour, Part 2|W|P|2/02/2006 12:29:00 PM|W|P|Cullen Bunn|W|P|

"The shelves go on for miles and miles. My collection of marbles gleams in a mason jar. My dried cicada waits to sing again in summer. My Duncan yo-yo that whistles except the string is broken and Dad’s got to fix it. My little book of suit cloth samples that I got from Mr. Parlowe at the Stagg Shop for Men. I use those pieces of cloth as carpet inside my airplane models, along with seats cut from cardboard. My silver bullet, forged by the Lone Ranger for a werewolf hunter. My Civil War button that fell from a butternut uniform when the storm swept Shiloh. My rubber knife for stalking killer crocodiles in the bathtub. My Canadian coins, smooth as the northern plains. I am rich beyond measure."

--Robert R. McCammon, BOY'S LIFE
I thought I'd start my new blog with a tour of my workspace, if for no other reason then to test out this new-fangled blogging thing all the kids are talking about. This is my favorite room in all the world--my home office.
Here we have my desk and the majority of my bookcases. The desk makes its sad, final stand in this room, for it will never survive another move. The bookcases are slightly mismatched. Along the side wall, the smaller shelves hold mostly paperbacks, some stacked on top of each other, some two stacks deep. The back wall houses an assortment of hardbacks and trade paperbacks, organized into "sections" such as "Lovecraftian," "Books I bought at World Horror Con," and "Supernatural and Strange Reference." On one of the lower shelves are all the magazines and anthologies in which I've been published. The shelves are also crowded with dozens of odd knicknacks, such as a plush Cthulhu, the Lovecraft Tarot, Baron Karza, gargoyles, and an urn containing the ashes of the toughest cat to ever walk the face of the earth. On my desk is a Bansai tree my wife has to remind me to water; I'm surprised its managed to live as long as it has. I have a Palm V that I didn't use even when Palm Vs were in vogue, but I can't bring myself to disconnect it from the computer. Positioned strategically around the desktop are dozens of ink pens, index cards, calendars, and CDs. You can tell I'm hard at work when the empty soda cans form numerous crooked towers across the desk.
|W|P|113891290038568067|W|P|Where I Do My Damage ... Office Tour Part 1|W|P|